Ourselves Appendix

Appendix

Questions for the Use of Students

BOOK I

Chapter I

THE COUNTRY OF MANSOUL

No Questions

Chapter II

THE PERILS OF MANSOUL

  1. Who is to blame for these perils?
  2. What effect has sloth upon Mansoul?
  3. What are the causes of fire?
  4. How may plague, flood, and famine be brought about?
  5. What are the consequences of discord?
  6. How does darkness arise in Mansoul?
  7. Can it be prevented?
  8. On what condition do things go well in Mansoul?

Chapter III

THE GOVERNMENT OF MANSOUL

  1. Why is being born like coming into a great estate?
  2. What do we mean by the government of Mansoul?
  3. Name some of the officers of state.
  4. Name the Chambers in which these 'sit.'
  5. Are these parts of a person?

PART I THE HOUSE OF BODY

Chapter I

THE ESQUIRES OF THE BODY: HUNGER

  1. What is the work of the appetites?
  2. When does an appetite become a danger?
  3. How does hunger behave?
  4. Distinguish between hunger and gluttony.
  5. How is greediness to be avoided?

Chapter II

THE ESQUIRES OF THE BODY: THIRST

  1. Why are we thirsty? What drink does thirst require?
  2. What are some effects of drunkenness?
  3. What is the principle on which persons abstain?

Chapter III

THE ESQUIRES OF THE BODY: RESTLESSNESS AND REST

  1. What is the use of restlessness?
  2. Wherein lies the danger?
  3. Show that rest and work should alternate.
  4. When does rest become sloth?

Chapter IV

THE ESQUIRES OF THE BODY: CHASTITY

  1. How would you teach a child to rule his appetites?
  2. How would you use the tree of knowledge of good and evil to give the idea of chastity?
  3. How would you explain, "Blessed are the pure in heart"?
  4. What heroic motive for purity would you give children?
  5. Where does slavery to an appetite begin?
  6. How would you rule the thoughts?

Chapter V

THE PAGES OF THE BODY: THE FIVE SENSES

  1. What two errors are possible to each of the senses?
  2. What are the uses and what the danger of the sense of taste?
  3. Show that we fail to get full use and full pleasure out of the sense of smell.
  4. What practice in catching odours would you give children?
  5. What manner of knowledge do we obtain by touch?
  6. Show by the 'touch of the blind,' a 'kind touch,' etc., that the sense of touch may be cultivated.
  7. What practice would you recommend?
  8. Why is it good to have little things to put up with?
  9. Show that sight brings half our joy.
  10. How may we learn to see more?
  11. What joy and what knowledge should we get from a sense of hearing?
  12. How may a good ear for music be acquired? 

 PART II THE HOUSE OF MIND

Chapter I

  1. Show that our way of speaking of 'ourselves' is like saying 'the sun rises.'
  2. Upon what does self-reverence depend?
  3. Show that self-knowledge must go before self-reverence.
  4. And that we must know ourselves before we can control ourselves.

Chapter II

MY LORD INTELLECT

  1. What is the function of 'intellect' ?
  2. Show that science is an immense and joyous realm.
  3. How is imagination serviceable in science?
  4. Compare history with the shows of a kinetoscope.
  5. How does history enable us to live in a large world?
  6. How are we making history?
  7. Show that imagination is necessary to the realising of history.
  8. What intellectual power is especially employed in mathematics?
  9. Why are mathematics delightful?
  10. Why is philosophy a necessary study?
  11. What are some of the advantages of a knowledge of literature?
  12. What powers of the mind go to the study of literature?
  13. Give three tests by which literature may be discerned.
  14. What are some of the uses of the aesthetic sense?
  15. How may we distinguish between art and simulated art?
  16. How may the intellectual life be promoted?
  17. In what ways may it be extinguished?

Chapter III

THE DAEMONS OF INTELLECT

  1. What effect has inertia upon the intellectual life?
  2. Why may we not stay in one field of thought?
  3. What do you understand by a magnanimous mind?

Chapter IV

MY LORD CHIEF EXPLORER, IMAGINATION

  1. Describe the functions of imagination.
  2. What effect has cultivation upon the imagination?
  3. In what two regions is imagination forbidden to work?
  4. How may self be exorcised from the imagination?
  5. What imaginings are especially to be avoided?
  6. How may wrong imaginings be hindered?

Chapter V

THE BEAUTY SENSE

  1. Show that exclusiveness is a temptation to persons who enjoy beauty.
  2. What error does the devotee of beauty make?
  3. Show that the beauty sense opens a paradise of pleasure.

 Chapter VI

MY LORD CHIEF ATTORNEY-GENERAL, REASON

  1. Compare the behaviour of reason with that of an advocate.
  2. Suggest the courses of reasoning which may have brought any two persons, Wycliffe and Wickham, for example, to different conclusions.
  3. Trace the conceivable course of reasoning of any philanthropist.
  4. Show the part of reason in all good works and great inventions.
  5. What is meant by common sense?
  6. Try to recover the train of reasoning of the man who first made a barrow.
  7. How is it that men have come to deify reason?
  8. Explain why equally good and sensible persons come to opposite conclusions.
  9. How does this prove that reason may bring us to mistaken conclusions?
  10. Show that an error of thought may lead to crime.
  11. Why is reason almost infallible in mathematics?
  12. Show that the power of reasoning is a trust to be used to good purpose.
  13. Show that reason works out a notion received by the will.
  14. Account for the fact that there are different schools of philosophy.
  15. What practice in reasoning would you advise for children?

Chapter VII

THE LORDS OF THE EXCHEQUER, THE DESIRES (Part I.)

  1. Compare the work of the desires with that of the appetites.
  2. How does the desire of approbation serve a man?
  3. Show that vanity may play the part of a mischievous daemon in our lives.
  4. Show that the desires of infamy and of fame come from the same source.
  5. How does the desire of excelling work with a hockeyplayer, for example?
  6. Show how this desire serves the man.
  7. Show that emulation may have mischievous results in education.
  8. Show the danger of emulation in things unworthy.
  9. How does the desire of wealth serve mankind?
  10. What are the risks attending this desire?
  11. How may the desire for worthless possessions be counteracted?
  12. Show that ambition is a serviceable desire.
  13. What dangers attend the desire to rule?
  14. Show that 'managing' people are injurious to those about them.

Chapter VIII

THE LORDS OF THE EXCHEQUER, THE DESIRES (Part II.)

  1. Show that the desire of society influences all sane persons.
  2. What gain to the mind should come from society?
  3. But upon what conditions?
  4. Show that the society of every good person is an opportunity.
  5. What two dangers attend the love of society?
  6. Show that we lose by cultivating only the society of our own set or sort.
  7. Which of the desires is to the mind as hunger is to the body?
  8. Distinguish between the desire of knowledge and what is commonly called curiosity.
  9. Show that it is upon the knowledge of great matters the mind feeds and grows.
  10. Show that the love of knowledge may be extinguished by emulation.
  11. What have you to say about 'marks' and 'places' in this connection?
  12. How should we be influenced by the fact that all 'normal' persons have powers of mind?
  13. Show that the duty of ordering our thoughts arises from the possession of these intellectual powers.

PART III THE HOUSE OF HEART

LORDS OF THE HEART: I. LOVE

Chapter I

THE WAYS OF LOVE

  1. What are the two affections?
  2. Mention some of the ways in which love shows itself.
  3. Have we any evidence of how much love is possible to a human being?
  4. Why is self-love necessary?
  5. When is love a counterfeit?
  6. Describe another form of counterfeit love.
  7. Name four tests by which love may be recognised.
  8. What is the apostolic rule on this subject?
  9. Of what feelings opposed to love are we capable?
  10. Why?
  11. What is the one petition in the Lord's Prayer to which a condition is attached?

Chapter II

LOVE'S LORDS IN WAlTING: PITY

  1. Show that there is pity in every heart.
  2. Name a few knights and ladies of pity.
  3. Show that 'a feeling heart' is a snare.
  4. Name a few causes sufficient to excite self-pity.
  5. Show the danger of this habit.
  6. In what two ways may we defend ourselves from this danger?

Chapter III

LOVE'S LORDS IN WAITING: BENEVOLENCE

  1. When is a person benevolent?
  2. Why is hearty liking for all persons possible?
  3. Show that his faults are not the whole of a person.
  4. How does the recognition of this fact work?
  5. Distinguish between goodwill and good-nature in dealing with other persons.
  6. Characterise 'benevolence.'
  7. Name half a dozen of the foes of goodwill, and show how they act.

Chapter IV

LOVE'S LORDS IN WAITING: SYMPATHY

  1. Show that sympathy with one should be a key to all.
  2. How should this fact affect our dealings with persons we suppose to be on a different intellectual level?
  3. How is it that poets, painters, and the like raise the rest of the world?
  4. On what condition is our sympathy helpful?
  5. What are the mischievous effects of a spurious sympathy?
  6. Show that tact is an expression of sympathy.
  7. Show that egotism destroys sympathy.
  8. What are the active and the passive manifestations of egotism?

Chapter V

LOVE'S LORDS IN WAITING: KINDNESS

  1. What is the office of kindness?
  2. Comment upon the kindness of courtesy.
  3. Show that there can be no kindness without simplicity.
  4. Comment upon a movement to make children kind.
  5. What is the most generous kindness of all?
  6. Show that the opposite behaviour is one of the chief causes of unhappiness in the world.

Chapter VI

LOVE'S LORDS IN WAITING: GENEROSITY

  1. Show that generous impulses are common to all the world.
  2. Show that generosity is impatient of cheap cynicism and of worldly wisdom.
  3. Show that generosity is costly but also remunerative.
  4. Show that the interests of the generous heart are duly distributed.
  5. Name a few fallacious notions that restrain generosity.
  6. What is the rule of life of the generous person?

Chapter VII

LOVE'S LORDS IN WAITING: GRATITUDE

  1. Why is gratitude a joy-giving emotion?
  2. How do we come to miss the joy of being grateful?
  3. What two courses are open to the receiver of small kindnesses?
  4. Why does a grateful heart always make a full return ?
  5. How may we escape the reproach of ingratitude?
  6. Do we owe gratitude to those only who are present and living?

Chapter VIII

LOVE'S LORDS IN WAITING: COURAGE

  1. Show that we all have the courage of attack.
  2. What are the 'daemons' that suppress courage?
  3. Show that we all have the courage of endurance.
  4. That panic, anxiety, and shameful fear are possible to us all.
  5. Show that the assurance of courage gives us the courage of serenity.
  6. Show that we have the courage of our affairs, and need not be anxious.
  7. Show that we fail if we have not the courage of our opinions.
  8. How shall we make sure of our opinions?
  9. Discuss the courage of frankness.
  10. How far may we practise reticence?
  11. Show that we are called upon for the courage of reproof.
  12. And for the courage of confession.
  13. What limits should we set to our confessions?
  14. How does the courage of our capacity serve us?
  15. Show that intellectual panic is responsible for many failures.
  16. What do you understand by the courage of opportunity? 

Chapter IX

LOVE'S LORDS IN WAITING: LOYALTY

  1. Why should youth be the age of loyalty?
  2. What is the test of loyalty?
  3. Show that our loyalties are prepared for us.
  4. What have you to say of loyalty to our king?
  5. Of loyalty to our own?
  6. What would you say of persons who choose to bestow their loyalty upon aliens and the like?
  7. Show that public opinion is responsible for anarchy.
  8. What does loyalty to our country demand of us?
  9. How shall we become ready to meet these demands?
  10. What service of loyalty does our country ask of us?
  11. Show that loyalty to a chief is the secret of "dignified obedience and proud submission."
  12. Show what loyalty to personal ties demands of us.
  13. Show that steadfastness is of the essence of all loyalty.
  14. Are all our loyalties due for life?
  15. When it is necessary to give up a chief or a dependent, how should the breach be made?
  16. Show that thoroughness is of the nature of loyalty.
  17. Describe the loyalty we owe to our principles.
  18. What are the tempers alien to loyalty ?

Chapter X

LOVE'S LORDS IN WAITING: HUMILITY

  1. Show that 'pride of life' is the deadliest of our perils.
  2. What are the two types of humility we have?
  3. How do we travesty the grace of humility?
  4. Why is humility rarely coveted as a Christian grace?
  5. Show that resentful tempers are due to self-exaltation.
  6. Show that humility is one with simplicity.
  7. When do we fall from humility?
  8. Why may we not try to be humble?

Chapter XI

LOVE'S LORDS IN WAITING: GLADNESS

  1. Why is it inexcusable in us not to be glad?
  2. Show that gladness springs in sorrow and pain.
  3. Show that gladness is catching.
  4. That gladness is perennial.
  5. Why, then, are people gloomy and irresponsive?
  6. Show that gladness is a duty.

LORDS OF THE HEART: II. JUSTICE

Chapter XII

JUSTICE, UNIVERSAL

  1. Show that we must know the functions of love and justice.
  2. Why does a cry for fair play reach everybody?
  3. What dispositions must we show (a) in word, (b) in thought, (c) in act, in order to be just?
  4. In what respects do we owe justice to all other persons?
  5. How may we ascertain the just dues of other persons?
  6. What should encourage us in our efforts?
  7. What is the demand of justice with regard to our own rights?

Chapter XIII

JUSTICE TO THE PERSONS OF OTHERS

  1. Show that we begin to understand the duty of justice to the persons of others.
  2. Show that to think fairly requires knowledge and consideration.
  3. In what sense does ungentleness inflict bodily injury?
  4. Why is courtesy a matter of justice?
  5. Show that we are not free to think hard things about others.
  6. Show that we must be just to the characters of others.
  7. What quality enables us to be just in this sense?
  8. How does prejudice interfere with justice?
  9. Show that respect is justly due to all men.
  10. What defect in ourselves interferes with the respect we owe?
  11. Show that respect must be balanced by discernment.
  12. How does appreciation fulfil the dues of justice?
  13. Why is depreciation unjust?

Chapter XIV

TRUTH: JUSTICE IN WORD

  1. Name a sign by which we may discern truth.
  2. Describe Botticelli's 'Calumny.'
  3. What instruction does the picture offer?
  4. How does Wesley distinguish between lying and slandering?
  5. How was envy regarded in the Middle Ages?
  6. Show the danger of calumnious hearing and calumnious reading.
  7. What misfortune has befallen the fanatic?
  8. How does Bacon describe 'the sovereign good'?

Chapter XV

SPOKEN TRUTH

  1. What is veracity?
  2. Show the error of qualified statements.
  3. Show that scrupulosity is not veracity.
  4. That exaggeration is mischievous as well as foolish.
  5. Why is it not truthful to generalise upon one or two instances?
  6. What temptations attend the desire to make a good story?
  7. Distinguish between essential and accidental truth.
  8. Show the value of fiction in this respect.
  9. Show that fiction affects our enthusiasms, and even our religion.
  10. Distinguish in some Bible stories between accidental and essential truth.
  11. Which of the two is of vital consequence to us, and why?

Chapter XVI

SOME CAUSES OF LYING

  1. How would you characterise lies told to lower another in the esteem of his friends?
  2. Comment upon cowardly lies.
  3. Show that the habit of reserve is akin to the lie of concealment.
  4. Show the folly of boastful lies.
  5. Show the danger of indulging in romancing lies
  6. Show that we owe truth to our opponents.
  7. What four qualities sustain truth?

Chapter XVII

INTEGRITY: JUSTICE IN ACTION

  1. Show that a 'ca' canny' policy is dishonest.
  2. By what standard is the work of every person judged?
  3. In what sense are we all paid laborers?
  4. Show that integrity of character is of slow growth.
  5. Why is 'Do ye nexte thynge' a part of integrity?
  6. Why does it belong to integrity to do the chief thing first?
  7. And also to finish that which we have begun?
  8. Show that drifters and dawdlers fail in integrity.
  9. That the person who cribs time also fails.
  10. Show the importance of integrity in the use of material.
  11. How does this principle apply to small debts?
  12. And to bargains?
  13. And to the care of our neighbours' property?

Chapter XVIII

OPINIONS: JUSTICE IN THOUGHT

  1. Give examples of opinions that are of no value for three different reasons.
  2. When is an opinion of value?
  3. Why need we have opinions at all?
  4. Distinguish between a faddist and a reformer.
  5. Mention a few matters upon which we must form opinions.
  6. Why should we be at pains to form opinions about books?
  7. What sort of books are of lasting value to us, and why?
  8. Give half a dozen counsels with regard to forming opinions.

Chapter XIX

PRINCIPLES: JUSTICE IN MOTIVE

  1. Why are our 'principles' so called?
  2. Show that principles may be bad or good.
  3. How are we to distinguish between bad and good principles?
  4. Our principles are our masters.' What is our duty with regard to them?

Chapter XX

SELF-ORDERING: JUSTICE TO OURSELVES

  1. What is our duty towards our bodies?
  2. Indicate several ways of being intemperate.
  3. Show that soberness includes more than abstinence from drink.
  4. What habit leads to the four kinds of physical vice?
  5. What changes mark the parting of the ways?
  6. Why does the drunkard drink?
  7. Indicate his fate.
  8. In what sense may we say that God puts us 'en parole' in the matter of self-indulgence?
  9. Show that excitement is a kind of intoxication.
  10. Show that gluttony is as offensive as drunkenness.
  11. Show how interests in life are a safeguard against offences.
  12. What is a common symptom of slothfulness, and what is the cure?
  13. Of the four roads to ruin, which is the worst?
  14. What caution and what command should help to safeguard us?

 PART IV

VOCATION

  1. What do boy and girl alike desire about the work they will have to do?
  2. How is it possible to prepare for our calling when we do not know what it will be?
  3. How may we get the habit of being of use?
  4. Show how the law of habit may help us or hinder us.
  5. Our calling comes to each of us. What must we do towards it?

BOOK II

INTRODUCTORY

  1. How is the body sustained, and how ruined?
  2. With what powers fitted to deal with knowledge is the mind endowed?
  3. What functions serve the same purpose for the mind as do the appetites for the body?
  4. Name some of the virtues which belong to love, and some of those which belong to justice.
  5. What virtues include the justice we owe to our own bodies?
  6. Why are body, heart, and mind in need of government?
  7. What are the governing powers?

PART I CONSCIENCE

SECTION I. CONSCIENCE IN THE HOUSE OF BODY

Chapter I

THE COURT OF APPEAL

  1. In what ways may conscience be figured by a judge in a court of law?
  2. To what two or three facts does conscience continually bear witness?
  3. Why is it possible for conscience to give wrong judgments?
  4. What advocate is employed to tamper with conscience?
  5. Why is it necessary that conscience should be instructed?

Chapter II

THE INSTRUCTION OF CONSCIENCE

  1. Upon what teachers does conscience depend for instruction?
  2. Account for the value of the teaching given by history and biography.
  3. For the peculiar value of the Bible as our instructor in morals.
  4. How does poetry teach us?
  5. Why is the teaching of the older novelists and dramatists to be preferred?

Chapter III

THE RULINGS OF CONSCIENCE IN THE HOUSE OF BODY: TEMPERANCE

  1. Give two or three examples from literature of intemperance in eating.
  2. In drinking.
  3. In taking our ease.
  4. In day-dreaming.
  5. What is Carlyle's counsel about work?
  6. What principle underlies temperance?
  7. Why may we not be solicitous about health?
  8. Show that neglect, also, of the physical nature arises from intemperance.
  9. Give a few rules for the ordering of our physical life.
  10. Why is it necessary to have clear principles as to our duty in this matter?

Chapter IV

THE RULINGS OF CONSCIENCE IN THE HOUSE OF BODY: CHASTITY (Part I)

  1. How do over-fond friendships affect chastity of soul?
  2. 'Yet how have I transgressed?' What lesson for our own lives does this question of the King (Edward II.) bring home?
  3. Why are we not free to give ourselves without reserve?

Chapter V

THE RULINGS OF CONSCIENCE IN THE HOUSE OF BODY: CHASTITY (Part II.)

  1. Cite some examples of sane and generous friendships.
  2. What rules for self-government may we deduce in each case?
  3. What two classes of friends claim our loyalty?

Chapter VI

THE RULINGS OF CONSCIENCE IN THE HOUSE OF BODY: THE FINAL UNCHASTITY

  1. Show the effect of dalliance in devious ways.
  2. What habit prepares the way?
  3. With what monster of our nature must we dread to be at death-grapple?
  4. Where does safety lie?
  5. How may we keep 'a virgin heart in work and will'?

Chapter VII

THE RULINGS OF CONSCIENCE IN THE HOUSE OF BODY: FORTITUDE

  1. Describe Botticelli's 'Fortitude.'
  2. Name some points in which Isaiah sets forth an image of fortitude.
  3. From two or three examples show that there is an element of tenderness in fortitude.
  4. Show that Sir Kenneth in The Talisman offers an example of fortitude.
  5. Give an example of fortitude under vexatious provocations.
  6. Of cheerful, serviceable fortitude.
  7. What of the 'black ribbon' when things go wrong?
  8. Show that fortitude belongs to the body.
  9. What is the apostolic injunction as to fortitude?

Chapter VIII

THE RULINGS OF CONSCIENCE IN THE HOUSE OF BODY: PRUDENCE

  1. Illustrate the fact that 'imprudence is selfishness.'
  2. Show that prudence is necessary in our affairs.
  3. In the choice of our friends.
  4. How does prudence act with regard to undue influence?
  5. Show that prudence prefers simplicity to luxury.
  6. That prudent citizens are the wealth of the state.
  7. What does the simplicity of prudence allow us in our surroundings?
  8. 'My servant shall deal prudently.' How was this fulfilled?

SECTION II. CONSCIENCE IN THE HOUSE OF MIND

Chapter IX

OPINIONS 'IN THE AIR'

  1. What part of our living do we emancipate from the judgment of conscience?
  2. Show the danger of casual opinions.
  3. How does a fallacy work?
  4. Give four rules that should help us in this matter of opinions.

Chapter X

THE UNINSTRUCTED CONSCIENCE

  1. Show that, in everyone, conscience is persistent upon some points.
  2. How do you account for moral instability, and by whom is it shown?
  3. Show, by example, that a nation may be unstable.
  4. Illustrate the danger of a besetting idea.
  5. Indicate some of the perils of moral ignorance.
  6. Show that undue scrupulosity is an outcome of ignorance.
  7. What moral advantage, exactly, has the instructed over the uninstructed conscience?

Chapter XI

THE INSTRUCTED CONSCIENCE

  1. Show, by some examples, that sound moral judgment is a valuable asset.
  2. Distinguish between the power to form moral judgments and the power to live a virtuous life.
  3. How are we to get the former power?

Chapter XII

SOME INSTRUCTORS OF CONSCIENCE: POETRY, NOVELS, ESSAYS

  1. Show that the power of poetry to instruct conscience does not depend on its direct teaching.
  2. Indicate the gradual way in which Shakespeare influences us.
  3. To what purpose should we read novels, and what sort of novels should we read?
  4. Why should essays be studied for instruction?

Chapter XIII

SOME INSTRUCTORS OF CONSCIENCE: HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY

  1. Why does history make great claims upon us at the present time?
  2. Distinguish between the informed and the ignorant patriot.
  3. Illustrate the need there is for some study of philosophy.
  4. By what means should we reach our convictions?
  5. Illustrate, by the behaviour of Columbus.
  6. How may we distinguish a 'message' from a fanatical notion?
  7. Give one secret of safety in matters of philosophy.

Chapter XIV

SOME INSTRUCTORS OF CONSCIENCE: THEOLOGY

  1. Most people 'live a poor, maimed life.' Why?
  2. Contrast our Lord's method of teaching with all usual methods.
  3. Account for the fact that our Lord's sayings are 'hard' intellectually as well as morally.
  4. 'They sit in darkness.' Who sit thus, and wherefore?
  5. Where is the harm of occupying our minds about questions of criticism?
  6. Have we any indications that we are declining from the knowledge of God?
  7. What is the one vital question for us all?
  8. When are the little religious books we use unwholesome?
  9. What should we bear in mind regarding the authors of the Scriptures?
  10. What may we look for in the lives of men as told in the Bible?
  11. Show that the revelation contained in the Bible is unique.
  12. What two laws would appear to regulate the revelations given to the world?
  13. What reflections should safeguard us from the 'Lo, here!' of each new religion?
  14. What is our hope of distinguishing between the merely human and the inspired elements in the Bible?
  15. How may we discern the essential truth in Bible narratives?
  16. Show that the disregard of life which shocks us in some of these is paralleled in our own day.
  17. Is there any key to the mystery?
  18. Why is it necessary to put away prejudices and misconceptions regarding the Bible?
  19. What is the penalty of ignorance about God?
  20. Show that the common notion of God as an 'indulgent' Parent is unfounded.
  21. Why is every slight record of Christ in the Gospels momentous to us?
  22. Name any arguments that present themselves to the mind of a Christian in answer to the statement that 'miracles do not happen.'
  23. Show that the words of Christ are more amazing than the miracles of the Gospels.
  24. Why may we not accept the modern tendency to reservation on the doctrine of the Resurrection and the Incarnation?
  25. What is the peril concealed in trivial doubts?
  26. What would you say of the temper which examines, and finally cherishes, every objection presented to the mind?

Chapter XV

SOME INSTRUCTORS OF CONSCIENCE: NATURE, SCIENCE, ART

  1. Show that ignorance is a vice in regard to the things of nature.
  2. In what two ways does nature approach us?
  3. Show that nature is an instructor in our duty towards God.
  4. That nature moves us to gratitude.
  5. Show that preoccupation of mind has of late shut out this teaching from us.
  6. What instruction has science for the conscience?
  7. Distinguish between science and scientific information.
  8. What duty is laid upon conscience with regard to science?
  9. With regard to art?
  10. In what spirit should we approach art?

Chapter XVI

SOME INSTRUCTORS OF CONSCIENCE: SOCIOLOGY

  1. Why is it necessary to understand how other people live?
  2. Why is casual help usually a hindrance?
  3. What are the conditions of helpfulness?
  4. In what sense is it wisdom to know ourselves?
  5. What have you to say of the greatness of human nature?

SECTION IlI. THE FUNCTION OF CONSCIENCE

Chapter XVII

CONVICTION OF SIN

  1. What is the office of conscience?
  2. What convictions appear to be common to all men?
  3. Show that religion is not a substitute for the instructed conscience.
  4. Name three habits of mind, either of which may stultify conscience.
  5. Show that the uneasiness of conscience testifies to sin.
  6. How do our sins of omission affect us ?
  7. Show that the chiding of conscience is a thing to be thankful for.

Chapter XVIII

TEMPTATION

  1. How does temptation come upon us?
  2. Whence does temptation arise?
  3. What is the secret of heroic lives?
  4. How is a trusty spirit trained?
  5. What is our part, that we may not enter into temptation?
  6. Is it possible for penitence to become an error?
  7. What is its due place?
  8. What do you understand by, 'I believe in the forgiveness of sins'?

Chapter XIX

DUTY AND LAW

  1. Why is it wrong to do 'wrong'?
  2. What is 'wrong'?
  3. In what various ways have people answered these questions?
  4. May we excuse wrong-doing because it is 'human nature'?
  5. Contrast the serenity of the enlightened Christian conscience with the uneasiness of superstition.
  6. Why is it a delight to perceive and to fulfil the law?

PART II THE WILL

Chapter I

THE WILL-LESS LIFE

  1. Show that it is possible for conscience, love, intellect, reason, to behave whimsically and unworthily.
  2. What power within us has the ordering of the rest?
  3. Show that it is possible to live without the exercise of will.

Chapter II

WILL AND WILFULNESS

  1. Show that wilful persons are of various dispositions.
  2. What is the common characteristic of wilful persons? Give examples.
  3. Contrast the behaviour of wilfulness and of will.
  4. Give some examples of will-power and wilfulness from Scott.
  5. Class a score or so of persons (in literature or history) on each side of a dividing line--on one side, the wilful; on the other, persons who will.
  6. Instance nations that fall on either side of such a line. Why?
  7. Describe the teaching which has weakened the will-power of Western nations.
  8. What is our Lord's attitude in this matter?

Chapter III

WILL NOT MORAL OR IMMORAL

  1. Show that will may act towards good or evil ends.
  2. That a person of will may use bad means towards good ends.
  3. Distinguish between 'will' and 'an ideal.'
  4. What curious question on this subject does Browning raise?
  5. What is the distinctive quality of a man?
  6. 'Thus far we have seen'--what six points concerning the will?

Chapter IV

THE WILL AND ITS PEERS

  1. Show that the will is subject to solicitations.
  2. That the will does not act alone.
  3. What is the business of will?
  4. When exercised, and upon what?

Chapter V

THE FUNCTION OF WILL

  1. What single power of man is a free agent?
  2. What is the one act possible to the will?
  3. Account for our increasing inability to choose.
  4. Show the evil of ready-made garments and ready-made opinions.
  5. Why may we choose for ourselves only, and not for others?
  6. How would you reconcile the two duties of choice and obedience?
  7. Distinguish between the obedience of habit and that of choice.
  8. What is it that we are called upon to choose between?

Chapter VI

THE SCOPE OF WILL

  1. Show how allowance may do duty for will-choice.
  2. Contrast the behaviour of will and allowance at the tailor's, for example.
  3. Is it necessary to make a choice of will, at first hand, on all small occasions?
  4. How does the fallacy underlying the 'newest and cheapest' lead us astray?
  5. What great will-choice is open to us all?

Chapter VII

SELF-CONTROL -- SELF-RESTRAINT -- SELF-COMMAND -- SELF-DENIAL

  1. What is to be said about moral self-culture for its own sake?
  2. How does absorption of any kind affect others?
  3. Show the difference between absorption as a phase, or for a purpose, and self-absorption.
  4. Describe a better way than moral self-culture.
  5. Show that what we call 'self-denial' is impossible to love.
  6. In what sense does our Lord claim self-denial from us?

Chapter VIII

THE EFFORT OF DECISION

  1. How do we try to escape the effort of decision?
  2. Sum up the sort of creed held in the name of 'Toleration.'
  3. Describe a picture of Ludwig Richter's showing how 'Providence' and 'freewill' co-operate.
  4. How may we distinguish a decision of will from one of 'allowance'?
  5. What two assets does the person who uses his will gather through his life?
  6. Show how these serve him on small and great occasions.

Chapter IX

INTENTION -- PURPOSE -- RESOLUTION

  1. Give two or three examples of the history of resolution.
  2. What truth is figured by the nimbus of the pictured saint?
  3. When does 'influence' become injurious?
  4. From what sort of influence must we safeguard ourselves?
  5. The influence of a person is in the ratio of -- ?
  6. What several acts of the will are required of us ?

Chapter X

A WAY OF THE WILL

  1. Sum up the conclusions arrived at so far with regard to the will.
  2. What is to be said to persons of good-will who dread temptation?
  3. Particularise the postern to be guarded.
  4. The porters on guard.
  5. Shall we fight or run away?
  6. In what 'way of the will' does our safety lie?
  7. Show that the same rule (what rule?) applies to intellectual and moral insurgent ideas.
  8. Show how our Lord's condemnation of fallacies proves that opinions are judged upon moral grounds.

Chapter XI

FREEWILL

  1. Why is it important to know all we can about the behaviour of the will?
  2. Sum up (again) the sixteen, or so, points we have endeavoured to make, so far.
  3. Distinguish between the man of good-will and the conventional person.
  4. What two services are open to men?
  5. What is the distinguishing mark of freewill?
  6. 'The poet has said the last word'; what is it?

PART III THE SOUL

Chapter I

THE CAPACITIES OF THE SOUL

  1. 'We wonder whether we are indeed finite creatures'; give four or five grounds for such wonder.
  2. Show the limiting and deceptive nature of our ordinary religious thoughts.
  3. Show in what respect the needs of the soul are satisfied by God alone.

Chapter II

THE DISABILITIES OF THE SOUL

  1. Name some of the chronic disabilities of the soul.
  2. How may we discern in ourselves 'the inert soul'?
  3. What is the cure of this soul-ailment?
  4. How does preoccupation affect our relations with God?
  5. Show how our 'involuntary aversion' to God may really be of service.
  6. Distinguish between voluntary and involuntary aversion.
  7. Show the supreme importance of will-choice.

Chapter III

THE KNOWLEDGE OF GOD

  1. What is the condition on which we may have the one satisfying intimacy?
  2. What persons have capacity for this intimacy?
  3. What tokens of the divine friendship may we look for?
  4. Name some of the ways by which the knowledge of God may first come to us.
  5. Show that the Bible is the immediate source of such knowledge.
  6. In what respect does the Bible stand alone among the great writings of the past?
  7. Show how fit and necessary the knowledge of God is to the soul of man.
  8. Is this knowledge inevitable?

Chapter IV

PRAYER

  1. Describe some of the movements of unconsidered prayer.
  2. Some of the responses to these.
  3. What two requirements of the soul are thus met?
  4. What are some of the uses and occasions of habitual prayer?
  5. How may we serve the world in our habitual prayers?

Chapter V

THANKSGIVING

  1. What causes restrain us from the gratitude we owe?
  2. 'My rising soul surveys' -- what occasions for being thankful?
  3. For what, besides our 'meat,' may we well 'say grace'?
  4. Why does it matter that we should thank God?

Chapter VI

PRAISE

  1. Show that 'praise' implies more than thanksgiving.
  2. Whom do we think of as being endowed with the right to praise God?
  3. Show that 'praise' is our duty also.
  4. Name some occasions of praise discovered by the Psalmist.
  5. What persons, to-day, especially afford us themes for praise?

Chapter VII

FAITH IN GOD

  1. Why do we find it perplexing to be told we must 'believe in God'?
  2. How does faith come?
  3. Show that we have faith in each other.
  4. That there are two sorts of faith in persons.
  5. Show that faith of both sorts is due to God.
  6. How shall we know if we have the faith of recognition?
  7. Show that faith is an act of will.
  8. Show that to believe in God is a duty required of us.
  9. Is this duty fulfilled in the service of men?
  10. Show that no article of the Christian (or of the Apostles') Creed appeals to our understanding.
  11. That all the great things of life also are mysteries.
  12. Show that Christianity means the recognition of Christ.